Odyssey Center for Ceramic Arts

MOLLY MORNING-GLORY

Molly Morning-glory was born into an apprentice style childhood, learning how to work with clay from her parents, Maggie and Freeman Jones of Turtle Island Pottery. At the age of four her father started her training in production methods. In high school Ms. Morning-glory was awarded three Scholastic Art Awards, two Silver Keys and a Gold Key, as well as the Asheville Art Museum Award for Ceramics. Molly received an Undergraduate Research Grant and graduated as a University Research Scholar with a BFA in Ceramics and Sculpture in 2010 from UNC-Asheville. This undergraduate training included a year at the Appalachian Center for Craft. After owning a functional pottery business for 3 years her work began transitioning to fine art sculpture. Ms. Morning-glory has received several awards and scholarships including a Teaching

Invitation at Seika University in Kyoto, Japan, Artist Residencies with Richard Hotchkiss in Grass Valley, California and at Breckenridge Creative Arts District in Colorado.

Currently she’s a Resident Artist at Odyssey ClayWorks in Asheville, NC. Molly was a 2016 NCECA Demonstration Assistant for Patti Warashina and Lauren Grossman, workshop Assistant for Patti Warashina at Santa Fe Clay, and will be again at the 2017 Women Working with Clay Symposium in June. Ms. Morning-glory’s work can be found in the Permanent Collection of North Carolina Pottery at the Mint Museum of Craft and Design in Charlotte and was featured in the 2016 group exhibition David Stuempfle


Hypnopompic: [hip-nuh-pom-pik] Of or relating to the semiconscious condition prior to complete wakefulness. The hypnopompic state is emotional and credulous dreaming cognition trying to make sense of real world stolidity

The hypnopompic state connects us to our emotional subconscious at a moment when the mind is trying to make sense of stolid reality; I build sculptures that work to resolve these previously contradictory states of being. I work with clay because it is malleable, much like our minds when waking from deep sleep.

Spending time in the hypnopompic state is an important part of my creative process as lucid morning dreams sponsor many of my ideas. I conceptualize a sculpture while in this place between realms and it helps me draw an idea from my mind through my hands and into clay.

Each experience garners a choice of reaction. There is a split second when the mind shuffles through emotions. By sculpting several responses at once on an elongated face I collect and analyze the multifaceted human experience of a finite moment. Emotions are rarely singular yet we are usually required to distill them for expedited explanation.

Instead, the eyes of my pieces take in experience. The lengthy distance of the nose gives time to process. The two mouths represent a choice of response or reaction.

Patti Heads with mirror face give the viewer a chance to interact personally with the sculptures as they supply the facial features. They are Self Portraits of the Viewer.

Rather than capturing emotion they provide a platform for exploration of expression. As a viewer closely inspects the face they see a distorted reflection of themselves. This not only references the dream-wake hypnopompic state it literally transmits their likeness onto the sculpture; often resulting in the viewer moving their bodies and heads to shift the reflection. The viewer chooses how to respond with the pieces rather than to the pieces

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